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Summary for this site is under review and the displayed data may not be fully up to date. If you need additional info, please call (206) 684-0464

Historic Name: Zadra Apartments Common Name: Parker Place
Style: Tudor Neighborhood: Queen Anne
Built By: Year Built: 1926
 
Significance

In the opinion of the survey, this property appears to meet the criteria of the Seattle Landmarks Preservation Ordinance.

In the opinion of the survey, this property appears to meet the registration requirements established in the National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Listing, Seattle Apartment Buildings, 1900-1957, for a low-rise apartment block.

This Tudor Revival style influenced multiple-family building, historically known as the Zadra Apartments and currently known as Parker Place is in the Uptown neighborhood.

The building was first listed in the Polk directories as the Zadra Apartments in 1927, shortly after Fred and Mamie Zadra moved into 567 Valley Street. The building remained under this name through 1975. Fred served as the apartment manager and worked as a car repairman with the Municipal Street Railway System.

The building retains good integrity, is a good example of a Beaux Arts style influenced apartment building, and has strong associations with the Zadra family.

References:

City of Seattle DCLU Microfilm Records.

Jeffrey Karl Ochsner, ed., Shaping Seattle Architecture: A Guide to the Architects (Seattle, University of Washington Press: 2014), 2nd edition.

King County Property Record Card (c. 1938–1972), Washington State Archives.

Polk's Seattle Directories, 1890–1996.

 
Appearance

Constructed ca. 1926, this multiple-family residential building is located at the southwest corner of Valley Street and Sixth Avenue N. The building fronts Valley Street. The site slopes slightly downward from west to east and from north to south. Planting areas extent off the front and side east facades with a large conifer against the northeast corner of the building. The two-story building features a square plan.

A flat roof with parapets shelters interior spaces. The roof features a rolled membrane type roofing material. Metal flashing extends along the top of the parapets. An added metal railing encloses a roof-top deck along the west side of the roof. An external brick chimney on the west facade services the building’s heating system. A corrugated metal clad shed roof enclosure projects on the south side of the roof at the stairway access to the roof.

A parged concrete foundation supports the building’s exterior walls. Through wall anchors at each floor level the walls to the floor plates. Per the building’s property record card, the structure is wood frame. Multi-colored brick veneer with a raked face clads the building. A rowlock band wraps the top edge of the parapet and a soldier course band marks the transition from the foundation to the first story. The front facade features a decorative three brick diamond detail at the parapet level above the middle window hood.

Window openings feature rowlock brick sills and soldier course headers. Brick moldings wrap the jambs and soffits of each window opening. Prominent painted wood hoods project over the second story windows on the front facade. These hoods consist of wood brackets supporting a flat architrave. The front facade features a central pair of round arched leaded glass casement sash. Two rowlock courses outline the window openings. Front and side facade window openings consist of paired sash with a central mullion. Smaller single sash window openings occur along the rear portions of the side facades and along the rear facade. Except for the leaded lite sash, all other sash have been replaced.

Entrances consist of the original front doorway, a rear personnel entrance, and added basement doorways. The front entrance consists of an elliptical arch highlighted by three concentric bands of rowlock brick. A pair of wall sconces flank the doorway which consists of a pair of wood 10-lite French doors. A pair of concrete steps lead up to the entrance.

Alterations include the 1972 conversion of the building’s furnace to a different fuel source (building permit 33288). In 2012 and existing detached garage south of the building was removed. Alterations also included the addition of two basement level doorways and windows on the south facade servicing apartments. This work included a new walkway along the south side of the building and renovating interior spaces. Except for the leaded lite sash on the front facade, all of the building’s windows have been replaced with contemporary sash (replacing 8:1 double hung wood sash). The building’s name was changed to Parker Place and a sign mounted on the front facade above the entrance.

Detail for this site is under review and the displayed data may not be fully up to date. If you need additional info, please call (206) 684-0464

Status: Yes - Inventory
Classication: Building District Status: NR
Cladding(s): Brick Foundation(s): Concrete - Poured
Roof Type(s): Flat with Parapet Roof Material(s): Asphalt/Composition-Rolled
Building Type: Domestic - Multiple Family Plan: Square
Structural System: Balloon Frame/Platform Frame No. of Stories: two
Unit Theme(s): Architecture/Landscape Architecture
Integrity
Changes to Plan: Intact
Changes to Windows: Extensive
Changes to Original Cladding: Intact
Major Bibliographic References

Photo collection for this site is under review and the displayed data may not be fully up to date. If you need additional info, please call (206) 684-0464


Photo taken Feb 27, 2018

Photo taken Feb 27, 2018

Photo taken Feb 27, 2018

Photo taken Feb 27, 2018

Photo taken Feb 27, 2018

Photo taken Jan 01, 1900
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